Painted Coaster – Set 5

This is another project that was sitting around for a long time waiting for me to finish it. I do have a few excuses: 1) Resin is difficult to work with so I normally put it off; and 2) Items should be varnished in warm weather. For these coasters, I use the Fluid Painting technique, also known as Pour Painting.

I first sealed the wood tiles using a white primer and let it dry for a few days. The paint mixture was 1 part acrylic paint to 2 parts Floetrol, with a drop of shredder oil. The different color paint, white, pink, light blue, dark blue, purple, red was layered in a cup (multiple time) and pour over the wood tiles.

I let the paint dry for weeks, before cleaning it with a mixture of Dawn soap and water. Again, I let it dry for a few days before spraying the tiles with varnish. And, then they sat for months. I had to dust them off before pouring the resin over the tiles. Resin does not like dust or oil. Either of these on the surface would cause bad results.

After letting the resin cure for a few weeks, I put glued cork on the back of each tile.

Double Crosses

These are the crosses I did for Mother’s Day gifts.  I ordered the blank wooden crosses from ArtisticCraftSupply on Etsy in July 2016.

The top piece on the cross was stained.  I left the back side of the top piece unfinished so I would have a better chance for the pieces adhering together when they were glued together.  The bottom cross was sealed with white primer, several coats.  I did a fluid painting pour over the top of the crosses using chalk paint.  The colors were: Dark blue, white, light pink, light green, light purple and light yellow.  I added Floetrol and water each paint color to help the paint flow, and silicon to the mixture to help form the cells.

After the bottom cross dried for several weeks, I cleaned the crosses with a mixture of Dawn and water.  I sprayed the mixture on the crosses and wiped gently.  After I let it sit for several weeks, I glued the top cross onto the bottom cross using wood glue.  Several coats of glossy vanish was used to finish the cross.

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I put a hanger on back of each cross attached with a screw.  The screw goes into both pieces of wood, so if the glue fails I have a backup.

Cosmo of Color

I had the idea that I wanted to do a pour painting that was larger than my normal 4″ x 4″ painting.  However, a large canvas can be expensive, ranging from a $5 to $50 depending on the quality.  Add on the cost of the paint and additive, a larger painting could easily cost $20+ to complete.  Did I have the experience needed to pour a larger canvas?

It occurred to me, I had a used 16″ x 20″ canvas.  It was a photo canvas from Walgreen that someone did not like and told me to throw it out.  However, I have issues with disposing of items that could be used in my crafts.  I double checked with the previous owner to make sure they did not want it, and I Gesso the photo canvas.  Still, nervous about painting the canvas, I let it sit for several weeks.  Then, I put on a second layer of Gesso, and let it sit for another week.

The colors I selected for the pour were:

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I found the paint on sale for 99 cents.  The painting took about 32 ounces of a mixture of paint, Floetrol paint additive, water, and a few drops of silicone.

The results:

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The technique I used was dirty cup pour.