Oh, Christmas Tree

On Thanksgiving, I asked my husband if he had any preferences for when I put up the Christmas tree. He said “No.”

On Black Friday, late in the afternoon, a brought the Christmas tree and the tree skirt up from the basement. My husband told me “You are suppose to do that while I am at work.” I think he just wanted me to cook supper and watch TV with him.

This is how my tree looked on Friday.

On Saturday, I added decorations.

My husband told me “You can put up the tree. It looks like you really want to.” I told him “No, I will put it up on Tuesday when I bake cookies.”

Sunday, I added lights to the tree.

Husband shakes head.

Monday, I put an angel on top of the tree.

Husband roll eyes.

I did get a letter from Santa.

Tuesday, I took the tree out of the box.

Husband comes home at lunch and asks what I did with the nicely decorated tree box.

Husband gets a look from me.

Here’s the decorated tree. Can a tree have too many ornaments?

I have come to realize, if I just left the tree in the box, I wont have to wrap presents because all the Amazon boxes would have match the tree.

The Bead Tree

This tree at the Hasting Museum, which they hid down in the “basement” had the most interesting ornaments of any of the other trees.  The ornaments were either decorated or made from beads.

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I do not need another craft, especially one that requires handling tiny beads and thin wires.  The Midwest Beaders should be proud of their beautiful work.

The Carpenters Tree

I do not know the official name of this tree at the Stuhr Museum, but I am calling it the Carpenters Tree.  It gets a special mention because of the uniqueness of the decorations.

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At first, all you really see is Home Deport cards.  If you look closers, you will see ornaments made from nails and screws.

 

Also, on the tree is wood panels each paint with a different design.