Walking Baton Rouge – No. 2

My second favor place to walk in Baton Rouge is the Highland Road Park.  It is located south of downtown, south of LSU, south of the Mall, but north of the Ascension Parish line.  The 2/3 mile walking trail is located on a hill.  Yes!  This area of Baton Rouge has hills.

But, don’t stay on the concrete walking path.  Go for an adventure.  Take the paths the cross country athletes use for training, or walk the area the disc golfer use.  It will take you into the trees, over bridges, to the tennis courts and splash pad.  Beware, their are two dangers here:  one rolling down a hill; and two to getting your shoes wet with dew if you are out early morning.

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Walking in Grand Island – No. 3

My third favor place to walk in Grand Island, Nebraska is Eagle Scout Park.  There is a lake in the middle of the park with a 1.01 mile walking trailing.  One of the benefits to walking in Eagle Scout Park is you are able to go in circles with no one judging you.  Unless, you have gone around in circles many, many times, then people have started talking about you.  Or, they have finished their few trips around the park and left.

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During the walk around the park, you are able to look at the trees, the waves on the water, and watch the corn grow in the nearby field.  There is a couple of things you need to be cautious about while visiting the park: one Wascally Wabbits; the pole wielding, capped homo sapiens perched on the lake’s edge, who occasionally emerge from the grass carrying their catches; and the swing sets that temps you to bring out your inner child.

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Eagle Scout Park almost made it to second favor walking location; however since they are building a huge sport complex next door, I predict the traffic and noise level at the park to increase which will hamper the peaceful walk around the park.

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Walking In Baton Rouge – No. 3

My third favor place to walk in Baton Rouge, Louisiana is the Baton Rouge Zoo.  In the mornings, during the summer months, it was not overly crowded.  You could keep up a good pace.  You may have to deal with the animals staring at you.  Also, keep a eye out for the 5 to 6 foot tall hooded homo sapiens wielding a garden hose.  They can be spotted in the early morning hours in many of the enclosures.    Another plus to walking in the zoo, is you get see monkeys and tigers showing off their lounging skills, and giraffes and rhinoceros demonstrating their eating skills while you are exercising.

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Drawing at Chick-fil-a

My goal is to draw something everyday on a 3 1/2″ tile.  The something does not necessarily has to be good, just something so I am putting pen to paper everyday.  Which is difficult when you are traveling.  I have found that drawing and breakfast at Chick-fil-a is a great way to start your day.  Here are some of the drawing that were created at a Chick-fil-a between July 6 and July 25 in South Louisiana.  I can’t tell you which location, because there were four locations that were convenient to my daily activities.

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July 6, 2018

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July 10, 2018

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July 11, 2018

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July 16, 2018

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July 19, 2018

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July 23, 2018

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July 21, 2018

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July 24, 2018

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July 26, 2018

 

Why Chick-fil-a verse the other options?  First, I don’t drink coffee or tea, so no coffee house.  Second, the service is good, the food is decent, and the restrooms are clean.  Third, some of their customers have the best conversations.

First Six Day of August

August is supposed to be the hottest month of the year.  If that is true, then stay under the A/C and draw.

Here are the first six daily drawing for August.

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August 1, 2018

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August 2, 2018

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August 3, 2018

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August 4, 2018

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August 5, 2018

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August 6, 2018

Views From Atop of the Louisiana State Capitol

The current Louisiana State Capital building was built during the depression era to create jobs by Governor Huey P. Long. Long was later shot and killed inside the building.

It is the tallest capital building in the United States. The observation tower is located on the 24th floor and the elevator go to the 30th floor.

The view of the Mississippi River shows you just how mighty it is. LSU”s tiger stadium can be seen from the tower.

Before you plan your visit, keep in mind that I don’t think that the government wants you to visit downtown Baton Rouge. Security is so tight around the capital building you can no longer park near it. Almost every other parking spot is 2 hour paid parking unless you want to park in a garage and walk. Be prepare to have your possessions scanned and walk through a metal detector.

Traffic in Baton Rouge is horrendous and don’t even attempt to cross the bridge during the hours surrounding rush the hours.

Fluid Painting – What I Have Learned!

Prep is key!

  • Make sure the surface that you are working on and the surface where the painting will be drying is level.  This will help prevent the paint from running off of one side of the canvas.
  • Paint will flow, so make sure that work surfaces are protected.  I use plastic.  Others have use trays to do their pours.
  • You will need something to raise the “canvas” off the work area.  The paint will need to be able to drip from the canvas.  I typically use disposable cups, or for small 4″ painting I use craft sticks.  Others have inserted thumb tacks into back of canvas.
  • Do not use canvas panels.  The paint will cause the panels to warp.
  • While the painting is drying; reduce the airflow around the painting.  This can be accomplished by storing the painting in an unvented room or placing a box around the painting while it dries.  The flow of air may make the paint flow off the canvas in an undesirable area.
  • You can pour on any surface; wood, tile, canvas….  Just make sure you seal and let dry any porous surface.  Primer on wood works fine.  Gesso in tile works fine.

Paint Mixture:

Most of the recommendations are to use a 50/50 mixture of acrylic paint and an additive.  The mixture should be the consistency of melted ice cream, so it will flow around the “canvas”.  My mixtures usually consisted of acrylic paint and Floetrol.  Floetrol is a latex paint additive that removes brush strokes.  It can be purchased from most hardware stores like Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware….  Occasionally,  I may add a small about of water, <10% of the additive mixture volume.

Stir the mixture well, don’t forget to scrap the sides.  Clumps in the paint mixture is bad.  Craft sticks work well for stirring.

You can have as many colors as you want, but the trick is: each color should have the same consistency.  Heavier colors will sink to the bottom on the “canvas”.  Thinner colors will float.

Experiment with smaller pours before you do a large pour.

You can use this resin calculator to determine how much paint mixture you will need.  https://www.artresin.com/pages/calculator

Cells in Painting:

If you want cells in the painting, you can add a few drops of silicone to each paint color. Or, you can use a blow torch on the painting.  I use treadmill oil..  Me and fire, No!  Stir into paint mixture gently.

Pours:

  • Decide on the colors
  • Make a mixture for each color
  • I usually place a thin layer of the paint mixture on the canvas before I do the pour.

Dirty cup pour – is where you layer the colors in a cup before pour it on the canvas.  Reminder:  colors in bottom of cup usually end up on top of painting.  You can either turn the cup upside down on the canvas, lightly tap it a few times, and raise the cup straight up; or you can just pour or drizzle the contents of the cup over the painting.

Another method is just to pour one paint color at a time over the canvas.  There are other methods too, such as swiping.

After the paint is on the “canvas”, tilt the canvas in all directions to spread the paint over the canvas.  For the missed areas on the edges of the canvas, you can use either your fingers or paint brush to cover the edges.  Sometimes, I will dip the miss corners into the paint drips. I usually attempt to clean the drips from the bottom edge of the canvas with a brush.

Let dry.  The painting can usually be moved after drying over night.  I usually let the painting dry several weeks to a month before applying the polyurethane.

If you used silicone in the mixture, let the painting dry at least two weeks and clean the painting.  I have a spray bottle with a mixture of Dawn and water that I spray over the painting and wipe gently with a paper towel to clean the silicone off.  After it is cleaned, let dry again.  I usually let it dry a several days to a few weeks after cleaning.

Seal the painting.  I use gloss polyurethane and multiple coats.  Some use resin.  Me and resin don’t always work well together.

Check my blog for more tips: https://sarahcath.com/category/crafts/pour-painting/

Note:

I am still learning.  Watching video, reading articles, and monitoring the Facebook group Acrylic Pouring Addiction.

Paintings:

I did a few pours today, because I needed fresh pictures to go with this blog post.  I am only about 70% satisfy with the results.  However, my last pour was the first of May, so I may be a little out of practice.

I dropped one of the craft stick onto one of the paintings, then one of the cups I was pouring from just jumped right out of my hand, and one of the canvases touch another canvas during the tilting phase.  See, out of practice.  However, the colors are brilliant.

Pours make excellent backgrounds for other paintings.

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