Acrylic Pour Coaster

I been wanting to create some Acrylic Pour Coasters for a while.  I purchased 4″ wood tiles from Michael’s and they traveled with me in my car for several months before a was able to work on them.

First, I applied white Gesso to both sides of the wood tile.   I mixed the paint in squeeze bottles.  The colors I used were pink, purple, grayish blue, light pink, light purple, green and white.  I love pinks and blues.

I let the tiles cure for about a month while I was out of town again. I cleaned the tiles with a mixture of Dawn and water, which I keep in a spray bottle.  A few weeks later when I got up the courage to apply resin, I poured resin over the coasters.

The tiles did not come out perfect, but it wasn’t a failure either.  The tray to hold the tiles was purchased from Hobby Lobby.  I stained the inside of the box and two sides.  The other two sides I applied Gesso and did a pour on the sides. 

I did not pour the inside of the tray, instead I cut out some white polymer clay and did a pour on top of the clay when I poured the tray sides.  After I cleaned the tray, I glued the clay to the bottom and applied several coats of varnish.

I glued cork to the back of each coaster using wood glue.  Below are the results.

Fluid Painting Coaster

This is my first attempt at pouring paint over four objects at the same time.  I found cheap sandstone coaster, shown below, at the Dollar General store and thought they would be perfect for my first attempt.

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I put a piece of parchment paper on the back of the coaster and taped the edges.

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I applied two coats of primer, and lightly sanded the coasters after the primer dried.  The holders were a stack of four craft sticks held together with the weaving loom rubber bands.

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I let my sister pick the colors.  She likes purple/blues with green accents.  Yes, I use cheap Walmart brand bags, the ones that are almost impossible to get open, to let the paint drip on.

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Lastly, it came time to put resin over the coasters.  These are the tips I learned while researching how to apply resin (because I have never been very successful):

  1. Clean the painting of any oily substance.  I let the coaster dry for at least a week, then sprayed the coaster with a mixture of Dawn and water.  I let them sit for a minute and gently wiped them off with a paper towel and let dry for another week.
  2. Seal the painting, because canvas breath and can cause air bubbles in the resin.  I seal the coasters with polyurethane and let dry for another week.
  3. Pour resin in temperatures above 70 degrees.
  4. Use torch to remove bubbles.
  5. Cover the work with a box while it dries.

I mixed and poured the resin over the coasters, spread it out with a plastic paint scraper, and removed the air bubble with a heat gun.  Yes, I know a torch is recommended.  But, while researching torches I scared me that I may burn down the house if the torch did not fully extinguish.  So, I was very carefully to keep the heat gun cord and my hair out of the resin.  The coasters were covered and let dry for 24 hours.

The results:

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