Plastercraft Houses 2019

Yes, it appears that I only painted two houses in 2019.  I did not get a chance to seal the houses until a few weeks ago, because of cold weather and Covid-19.  (I can’t varnish if someone in the household sinuses gets upset around paint and varnish.)

These are California Creations houses.  The company went out of business in the early 2000s.  Yes, these have been in storage waiting for me to paint them.

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Pink House

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Bed and Breakfast

 

Fluid Painting – What I Have Learned!

Prep is key!

  • Make sure the surface that you are working on and the surface where the painting will be drying is level.  This will help prevent the paint from running off of one side of the canvas.
  • Paint will flow, so make sure that work surfaces are protected.  I use plastic.  Others have use trays to do their pours.
  • You will need something to raise the “canvas” off the work area.  The paint will need to be able to drip from the canvas.  I typically use disposable cups, or for small 4″ painting I use craft sticks.  Others have inserted thumb tacks into back of canvas.
  • Do not use canvas panels.  The paint will cause the panels to warp.
  • While the painting is drying; reduce the airflow around the painting.  This can be accomplished by storing the painting in an unvented room or placing a box around the painting while it dries.  The flow of air may make the paint flow off the canvas in an undesirable area.
  • You can pour on any surface; wood, tile, canvas….  Just make sure you seal and let dry any porous surface.  Primer on wood works fine.  Gesso in tile works fine.

Paint Mixture:

Most of the recommendations are to use a 50/50 mixture of acrylic paint and an additive.  The mixture should be the consistency of melted ice cream, so it will flow around the “canvas”.  My mixtures usually consisted of acrylic paint and Floetrol.  Floetrol is a latex paint additive that removes brush strokes.  It can be purchased from most hardware stores like Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware….  Occasionally,  I may add a small about of water, <10% of the additive mixture volume.

Stir the mixture well, don’t forget to scrap the sides.  Clumps in the paint mixture is bad.  Craft sticks work well for stirring.

You can have as many colors as you want, but the trick is: each color should have the same consistency.  Heavier colors will sink to the bottom on the “canvas”.  Thinner colors will float.

Experiment with smaller pours before you do a large pour.

You can use this resin calculator to determine how much paint mixture you will need.  https://www.artresin.com/pages/calculator

Cells in Painting:

If you want cells in the painting, you can add a few drops of silicone to each paint color. Or, you can use a blow torch on the painting.  I use treadmill oil..  Me and fire, No!  Stir into paint mixture gently.

Pours:

  • Decide on the colors
  • Make a mixture for each color
  • I usually place a thin layer of the paint mixture on the canvas before I do the pour.

Dirty cup pour – is where you layer the colors in a cup before pour it on the canvas.  Reminder:  colors in bottom of cup usually end up on top of painting.  You can either turn the cup upside down on the canvas, lightly tap it a few times, and raise the cup straight up; or you can just pour or drizzle the contents of the cup over the painting.

Another method is just to pour one paint color at a time over the canvas.  There are other methods too, such as swiping.

After the paint is on the “canvas”, tilt the canvas in all directions to spread the paint over the canvas.  For the missed areas on the edges of the canvas, you can use either your fingers or paint brush to cover the edges.  Sometimes, I will dip the miss corners into the paint drips. I usually attempt to clean the drips from the bottom edge of the canvas with a brush.

Let dry.  The painting can usually be moved after drying over night.  I usually let the painting dry several weeks to a month before applying the polyurethane.

If you used silicone in the mixture, let the painting dry at least two weeks and clean the painting.  I have a spray bottle with a mixture of Dawn and water that I spray over the painting and wipe gently with a paper towel to clean the silicone off.  After it is cleaned, let dry again.  I usually let it dry a several days to a few weeks after cleaning.

Seal the painting.  I use gloss polyurethane and multiple coats.  Some use resin.  Me and resin don’t always work well together.

Check my blog for more tips: https://sarahcath.com/category/crafts/pour-painting/

Note:

I am still learning.  Watching video, reading articles, and monitoring the Facebook group Acrylic Pouring Addiction.

Paintings:

I did a few pours today, because I needed fresh pictures to go with this blog post.  I am only about 70% satisfy with the results.  However, my last pour was the first of May, so I may be a little out of practice.

I dropped one of the craft stick onto one of the paintings, then one of the cups I was pouring from just jumped right out of my hand, and one of the canvases touch another canvas during the tilting phase.  See, out of practice.  However, the colors are brilliant.

Pours make excellent backgrounds for other paintings.

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Cosmo of Color

I had the idea that I wanted to do a pour painting that was larger than my normal 4″ x 4″ painting.  However, a large canvas can be expensive, ranging from a $5 to $50 depending on the quality.  Add on the cost of the paint and additive, a larger painting could easily cost $20+ to complete.  Did I have the experience needed to pour a larger canvas?

It occurred to me, I had a used 16″ x 20″ canvas.  It was a photo canvas from Walgreen that someone did not like and told me to throw it out.  However, I have issues with disposing of items that could be used in my crafts.  I double checked with the previous owner to make sure they did not want it, and I Gesso the photo canvas.  Still, nervous about painting the canvas, I let it sit for several weeks.  Then, I put on a second layer of Gesso, and let it sit for another week.

The colors I selected for the pour were:

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I found the paint on sale for 99 cents.  The painting took about 32 ounces of a mixture of paint, Floetrol paint additive, water, and a few drops of silicone.

The results:

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The technique I used was dirty cup pour.

Piano Jewelry Box

It appears I forget to share my Piano Jewelry Box.  Since, I give away most of the items I finish as gifts,  I normally have to wait until after their birthday blog about it.

The piano box was ordered from Amazon in November with an expect delivery date in December.  It was delayed so many times, Amazon threaten the supplier with cancellation if they did not ship it.  It finally arrive in early January 2017, which left me with only two weeks to finish the box and ship it out.

The box was finished with ebony stain.  I wanted to get it dark, really dark, like a grand piano.  The box appeared to have the keyboard cover down, so I did not have to paint keys on the piano.  The name plate was made with polymer clay. The balls on the legs were painted with silver acrylic paint and numerous coats of polyurethane to give it a high gloss shine.

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I thought about putting music notes inside the jewelry box, but after some thought and test runs, I decided the space inside was small and it would not hold much.  So, I made polymer clay roses and put them inside the box.  The leafs were left overs from other projects.  The roses were glued down and coated with several layers of polyurethane.

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Maybe I should write a blog about how I make roses from clay.  I make them differently than what I have seen on other websites.  And, I have been making the same way since the Play-doh days.

Tissue Box

I saw a some videos on fluid painting and pour painting.  Just watching the videos is mesmerizing, and the results are beautiful.  I decided to try it out.  But, I did not have any fluid to add to paint to get it to flow.  All I had was the acrylic paint that comes in the 2oz bottles.  I use a trash bag and painter tapes to tape off each side that I would not be painting.   I used metallic acrylic paint.   Letting each side cure overnight.  It took days to finished.  The outcome was impressive.

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Now, I trying to decide if I should do a pour on the inside of the tissue box, or just leave it like it is.

The Box Project

I found this box at Hobby Lobby and I had to finish it.  I decided to stain and varnish the box and for the cut out, to use chalk paint.  Since I never used chalk paint, I decided I needed a test piece to determine if I wanted an antique finished.

This is the test piece with the same chalk color and an antique finished.

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Needless to say, I did not go with an antique finish.

The box frame was stain in dark walnut and varnish with a clear gloss.  The cutout was stained in ebony.

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I painted the inside of the lid to match the outside.

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To finish off the box, I decide to put a mosaic pattern on the inside of the box that match, not exactly, the cover of the box.  The mosaic tiles were made from polymer clay.  For the grout I used gold puff paint, a.k.a. fabric paint.

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The filler mosaic is a black, brown, turquoise, gold combination.  Since I had a lot of extra clay, I decide to use them on the test cross piece.  This is the final result.

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Christmas Ornaments – Part 1

Around this time of the year, I work on something that has a Christmas theme.  This year I have painted some wooden Christmas ornaments.   Most of the ornaments were purchased from Michael’s Craft Stores in Oklahoma, Texas, and Louisiana.

The bell ornaments were painted with multiple layers of red and green acrylic paint.

For all the ornaments, I selected the DecoArt Americana Acrylic paint because it is thicker then most paint and covers better.  I used Delta Creamcoat for the gold metallic paint.  Then I covered the ornaments with Delta Creamcoat Sparkle Glaze.  The ornament probably didn’t need to be varnished after the glaze, but I wanted a good high gloss finish, so I put several coats of Miniwax Polycrylic on them.  The Polycrylic has worked well on my polymer clay creations.

The snowflake ornaments, yes there are two of them, the base was painted  with sapphire and then dry brushed with white paint.  I left the edges unpainted because I thought it gave them an old fashioned look.

The angel ornaments were purchase at Hobby Lobby.

I selected yellow and green paint for the star ornaments.  Before I applied the glaze, the green areas was dry brushed with gold paint.

The tree and bell ornaments were painted using the same process as described above.

The angel ornaments were purchased at Hobby Lobby.  I should have taken time to sand these ornament, because there are a few rough places on them.

This post is Part 1 because there are more ornaments that are unfinished.