3D Printing – The Easter Egg

Yesterday, I designed an Easter Egg using Tinkercad.  Today, I printed the Easter Egg.  Creating the Egg in Tinkercad is easy.  They have a egg object.  Hollowing out the egg is easy; copy egg, reduce the size, make it a hole, align the solid egg with the hole egg, and group.

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Making the two egg halves with the crack was more complicated than making the chick.  The chick is two circles for the body, two circles for the eyes, two flatten and stretched trapezoid for the wings, the heart shape for the head, and Tinkercad’s  chicken foot object for the feet.

To see how I created the crack in the egg, check it out here.  Note:  I am working on other cool chicks, so the design my change.

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I probably could have made the chicken bigger, maybe I will.

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The egg was printed on Ultimaker 2+ printer.  I read that beta version of the Cura Software allows more control over supports.  Yay!

Tinkercad – the free, online 3D CAD app

Amazon Echo Show Privacy Shield

I do not believe that Amazon is spying on us, but there are a numerous hackers in the world.  And, getting dressed in front of a camera….

This privacy shield is for the Amazon Echo Show to cover the camera.  It will put the device to sleep because it can not detect movement in the room.   You can still access the three buttons on top of the device with the shield installed.

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The Camera is in the top center of the device.

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I put “Alexa” on the shield because that is the wake up word for the AI.

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This gadget was made with Tinkercad, and is published on Thingiverse and YouMagine.

Tinkercad, the free, online 3D design and 3D printing app.

Clackers

It all started on Facebook and someone saying “Do you remember…”  Yes, I do remember Clackers, they were fun to play with, but dangerous (will at least in today’s world.)  We would get hit with one or both of the glass balls and go ouch or whoops.  However, in today’s world, they are safer than the Tide Pod challenge.

My 3D printer and I were not getting along, so we both took a break from each other.  After the Facebook posting, I decided it was time to put the print back to work.  And, one of the simplest thinks to design and print would be a ball with at hole in the middle.

I used Tinkercad to design it.  5cm ball with a hole in the middle.  I then did the thing I been regretting for a while, I cleaned, oiled and balanced the printer.  The first print failed, the item was not adhering to build plate.  Failure.  I rebalanced the build plate.  Failure.  I removed the build plate and cleaned it with soap and warm water and rebalanced the build plate.  Success, I had one ball for my clackers, so I printed a second one.

The string is only nylon string with a loop tied at the top and a knot at the end of each ball.

My family have official declared me weird.

 

Stand For Fluid Painting

Fluid Painting can be messy.  You pour paint over the canvas and it drips over the edges.  What a mess!  I am not a clean freak, just a person working in limited space and I need my table to draw and do other things.  So far, I have limited myself to 4″ canvases, and I have a 3D printer sitting right next to my work table… I decided I would design and print a stand for my pour paintings.

The maximum print size of my Ultimaker 3d printer is around 8 inches, width and length.  The height can go up to around 12 inches.  So, this project was perfect.

The catch basin is 5″ square, or in my design world 127mm, and 1″ (25.4mm) high.  Just in case different colors dropped from the different edges of the canvas, I divided off the catch basin and add drain notches.  It didn’t need it, but I placed pegs to hold the stand, and divided off this compartment to keep paint off of the stand.  It took around 11 hours to print.

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The design was done in Tinkercad and export as a STL file.  The file was imported into Cura and where a .gcode file was made.  I used the “normal” setting because the “fine” setting indicated it would take 23 hours to print.  Therefore, some warping occurred because of the setting and because I select not to add a Brim support.

The stand was also designed in Tinkercad.  It is 3 inches high.  The break in the structure allows for air to flow under the canvas.  It took around 4 hours to print.

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The notches on top of the stand, allows me to put some other type of support under the canvas to lift off, in case I want to reuse the stand before drying is complete.

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The finished product.

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The colors, yes I used Color Shift paint by Folk Art and grab the black and 4 other colors.

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The test.

Ok, some of the holes leaked.  The center dividers should have been larger and I did not pour out of the basin as I expected.  I do not know if I am going to tweak the design and reprint it or not.  Probably.

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I did get a cup (one ounce) out of the basin.  It should go nicely with another pour.

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Chocolate Explosion

I am calling today’s Fluid Painting Chocolate Explosion.  It reminds me of chocolate milk.  This painting took on a different twist.  First I designed and printed the 3D object, shown below, to create my painting.  The object has an 2″ diameter, and 1″ tall.  The holes are 8mm with the center hole 10mm.  By applying a thin layer of paint to the canvas, I was able to place the object on top of the canvas and fill with layers of paint.  No paint leaked out until I lifted the object.

The small painting measuring 4″x4″.   First I put a light pink color on the canvas, and then place the object on top.  I then pours light blue, dark blue, light yellow, chocolate, and pink into the container.  I let it sit for a few minutes and blew gentle on it to release air bubbles.   When I lifted the object straight up, the paint flowed out of the object quickly.  After tilting the canvas, this was the result.

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2017 Christmas Card

It is the Christmas Season!  All the presents are wrapped and all the cards have mailed; it is time that I share with you my Christmas Card of 2017.

I usually start thinking about my Christmas Cards around July.  If I wait until Thanksgiving, I sure that disasters will strike and I would be force into buying Christmas cards from the store.  This year the ideal was a Snow Globe Christmas card.  I researched the ideal and knew it was possible.

But, I didn’t really want to put a piece of plastic wrap or it’s equivalent on the card.  And, than I found Jullibean Soup’s Large Circles by Hampton Art.  It was a quick Click and Order from Amazon.  Once the circles came in, I started to work on the card.

I thought about designing a village scene to put inside the snow globe, but I wanted a little deep.  Then it occurred to me; I have polymer clay, I have cutters for snowman and trees.  The card was coming together.

The snowman, trees, and snow were made with Sculpey Polymer Clay using a setting of 3 in the pasta machine and cut with “cookie” cutters, bake and covered with sparkle varnish.  (Which was the first mistake.)  However, I need to draw the face and buttons, and color the hats on the snowman.  I got out may Sharpie pens and colored the hats.  They looked awful.  I should not have varnished the snowmen first.  What was I going to do, paint all the snowmen?  Nooooo!  I had just recent purchase a set of Chameleon Pens, which worked with beautiful results.  It even covered where I used a Sharpie.

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Since the Snowman were coming together, I could now design the inside of the card.  This was done using Corel Draw.  I probably spend too much time making snowflakes, but I was having so much fun.  I hope the shading on the snowman gives it some dimension.

2017 Card Snowman

At Office Depot, I found dual color cardstock.  It was light blue on one side and white on the other side.  This was perfect for my card.  It would give me the blue sky I wanted behind the snowman scene on the front and white on the inside.  I found the snowflake paper at Hobby Lobby.  I found some nice light blue glitter paper at JoAnn’s and had the silver paper left over from last year.

The Jullibean Soup circle comes with adhesive around the circle, so it was not necessary to stick it through the first layer of paper and glue everything down.  I used Silhouette Studio to design the silver snow globe and the cut for the top paper layer.   Everything was cut using my Silhouette Curio.   I was really dreading gluing it all together.

More research.  I found this wonderful blog that talked about ways to glue paper together.  Did you know you can put cheap plastic wrap between two piece of paper and use a hot iron to fix them together.  I didn’t use plastic wrap.  The blog also talk about Xyron Creative Station for sticking paper together.  This is the best machine I have bought all year.  It did exactly what I expected.  It basically creates stickers when you roll your paper through the machine.  Afterwards, you just peel it off and stick it where you want it.  It even handled the delicate “Merry Christmas”.

To assemble the card:

First step: print the inside of the card on cardstock on the correct side of the paper and cut everything.  Run the snowflake paper, the silver snow globe, and the Merry Christmas through the Xyron Creative Station.

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Third step:  Use glue dots to fix the snowman, trees, and snow to the card.  Top with snow.  (Second mistake.)  After sitting in a box for several weeks, the trees and snowman started to come loose.  The problem was I did not use permanent glue dots for those items.  I had to gently open up at least half of the cards and redo the inside.  I am glad I switched glue dots during the assembly.

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Fourth step:  Place plastic circle on tope of snowman and snow.

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Fifth step:  Place silver globe around circle and add Merry Christmas.

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We have a finished card.  Well, almost.  It needed something else.  I used glitter glue to around the border to give it more sparkle.

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I put the card in an envelope that I stamped with snowflakes.  Both, envelope and card was mail in a bubble mailer.  Any thicker and the card could not be sent First Class mail.

Klingon Adventure

During Kur’Den’s recent travels through the Universe, he used his communicator to send back fascinating images from his adventure.   Below are the photos:

Since Kur’Den’s day of birth was about to be recognized on Stardate 70989, I remotely accessed his Klingon log file, a.k.a. Facebook, and obtained an official picture of him.

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I then proceeded to combined the adventure pictures with the official picture.

Meet Kur’Den, Tuq BelmoH Yotlh!  Sorry, Captain Kur’Den.

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3D Printed Tree

I know Christmas is over and the new year has started, but this was my main adventure for November and December.

Many months ago, I got the idea that this year’s Christmas card would be 3D printed.  After many rough drafts, I decided on the “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” design.

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The initial design phase went smoothly.  And then, I had more ideas.  The words on the tree should turn, so the tree would look like it had stagger branches.  The words on the tree should be readable from any angle.  Oh, it need a tree skirt and the simplest design would have stars on the skirt.

It then occurred to me the tree needed a train going around it.  Well, the train could not literally go around it, because the size of the train.  My printer would not be able to print the tiny detail the train would need to allow it’s wheels to turn.

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I still was not entirely happy with the tree skirt.  The tree needed presents.  I designed three unique presents and place them under the tree scaling them to different sizes and placing them under the tree at different angles.

Designing the tree was the easy part.  Printing the tree out, proved to be the most challenging part.  The filament started grinding.  I regularly had be dismantle the extruder box to remove filament.  I also had to dismantle and reassemble the printer head on no  least three occasions to correct issues.  That is why only 6 of these Christmas tree were sent to friends and family.

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There were eight .stl files created to print the tree.

The .stl files can be downloaded from youmagine.com.

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/we-wish-you-a-merry-christmas-tree/embed

Tinkercad – the free, online 3D CAD app

Dominoes

My father-in-law has shown very interested in the 3D printing.  Asking questions about how it works and what can it print.  Before Father’s Day, I sat down in from of the computer and said “What can I print for my father-in-law?  He plays dominoes every Friday!  I can do that!”

I looked up the dimensions for Dominoes; design the dominoes; and created the case to look like a domino.

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His own personalized dominoes.  I also printed a set for my dad for Father’s Day with his last name on them.

The .stl files can be downloaded from youmagine.com.

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/dominoes/embed

Tinkercad – the free, online 3D CAD app